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Microfluidics: from Jell-O to diagnosing disease

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Seminar Details
Presenter Name: 
Eric Lagally
Faculty Supervisor(s): 
Eric.Lagally
Date: 
Monday, March 7, 2011 - 12:00pm
Location: 
Michael Smith Laboratory 102, UBC
Seminar Abstract: 

Microfluidics is an emerging technology used to reduce the size and increase the speed of common laboratory assays (procedure for measuring biochemical activity), as well as to combine different assays into entire "lab-on-a-chip" devices. Chemical and Biological Engineering Professor Eric Lagally’s research group has contributed several new microfluidic systems, including "chips" that perform hundreds of protein binding experiments in parallel, concentrate bacteria from clinical samples, or detect molecules specific to prostate cancer. Recently the team realized the true power of microfluidics may lie in less complicated systems, specifically those useful in situations where time and money are the limiting constraints. Examples of this application space include both classrooms and the developing world. Recent work has sought new materials and simpler fabrication to achieve the benefits of microfluidics while minimizing cost and complexity. Join Professor Lagally as he shares two projects from the lab, the use of Jell-O gelatin dessert to make hands-on microfluidic teaching tools and the development of ultra-low-cost fabrication tools using common consumer electronics parts.

Presenter Biography: