User login

Nanoelectromechanical Resonators: Novel Fabrication Techniques and Applications to Proteomic Analysis

  • strict warning: Only variables should be passed by reference in /home/minachr5/public_html/modules/date/date/date.theme on line 329.
  • strict warning: Only variables should be passed by reference in /home/minachr5/public_html/modules/date/date/date.theme on line 334.
  • strict warning: Only variables should be passed by reference in /home/minachr5/public_html/modules/date/date/date.theme on line 335.
  • strict warning: Only variables should be passed by reference in /home/minachr5/public_html/modules/date/date/date.theme on line 329.
  • strict warning: Only variables should be passed by reference in /home/minachr5/public_html/modules/date/date/date.theme on line 334.
  • strict warning: Only variables should be passed by reference in /home/minachr5/public_html/modules/date/date/date.theme on line 335.
Seminar Details
Presenter Name: 
Stephane Evoy
Date: 
Monday, November 24, 2008 - 4:00pm
Location: 
Kaiser 2020
Seminar Abstract: 

Nanoscale resonators offer great potential as sensing devices due to their high sensitivity to added masses or external forces. The sensitivity of mechanical resonators scales favorably as their dimensions are reduced, offering a compelling path for the development of sensors with exceptional mass sensitivities. Nanomachining now allows the fabrication of mechanical objects with lateral dimensions of about 100 nm and resonant frequencies in the ultra-high frequency range. Given their small volumes and high surface-to-volume ratios, these nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) are of great interest for the detection of mass with high sensitivity.

The National Institute of Nanotechnology (NINT) is engaged in a series of state-of the art research programs related to the development and applications of nanomechanical resonators. Suspended resonators as narrow as 30 nm, the narrowest structures ever produced by any machining method, have been produced using a novel combination of surface nanomachining and bulk etching. Alternatively a partnership with Hewlett-Packard laboratories has recently enabled the production of clamped resonant nanowires with diameters as narrow as 20 nm. We will present an overview of those novel nanofabrication technologies, and discuss our efforts towards their applications for the analysis of molecular mixtures.

Presenter Biography: 

Stephane Evoy received a M.Sc.A. in Engineering Physics from the Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, and a Ph.D. in applied physics from Cornell University in 1994, and 1998, respectively. He is Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Alberta, with cross-appointment as Research Officer with the Devices and Sensors Group of the National Institute for Nanotechnology. Dr. Evoy has co-authored over 35 papers and 60 presentations in the area of nanoelectromechanical systems, nanofabrication, and scanned probe microscopy. His current research includes the development and integration of nanomechanical devices for biosensing applications, as well as the integration of nanostructures for the development of chemical sensing arrays. Dr. Evoy has also recently co-edited "Introduction to Nanoscale Science and Engineering", a textbook supporting the teaching of nanoscale technologies at the undergraduate level. He is currently serving as member of the executive committee of the Nanoscale Science and Technology Division of the American Vacuum Society. Since October of 2005, he is also serving on the editorial board of "Review of Scientific Instruments".