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Particles and Gel in Small Channels

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Seminar Details
Presenter Name: 
Dr. Boris Stoeber
Date: 
Wednesday, July 2, 2008 - 1:00pm
Location: 
Kaiser 2020
Seminar Abstract: 

Dr. Stoeber's research group is investigating the flow of non-newtonian fluids in microfluidic environments.
Understanding such fluids in small-scale environments allows designing robust microfluidic systems as well as new flow control methods. This talk will include a discussion of suspension flows and thermally responsive polymer solutions in microfluidic environments.
Small particles from suspensions tend to deposit in specific regions in microfluidic channels, where they build up over time and eventually block a flow passage. The effect of particle size and size distribution on channel clogging will be discussed, as well as a simple empirical model that describes this mechanism.
In addition, thermally responsive fluids that can reversibly form a gel upon heating will be presented. The small scale of microfluidic channels allows using this effect for active valving or for passive flow control.

Presenter Biography: 

Boris Stoeber is an Assistant Professor at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, where he holds a joint position with the Department of Mechanical Engineering and with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He received the diploma degree in Electrical Engineering from the Technische Universit├Ąt Darmstadt, Germany, and the diploma degree in General Engineering from the Ecole Centrale de Lyon, France, both in 1998, and the Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California at Berkeley, U.S.A., in 2002. Before joining the University of British Columbia he was a postdoctoral scientist with the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of California at Berkeley. His research interests are in the area of microsystem technology including microelectromechanical system (MEMS) design and fabrication, microsensors and actuators, for applications in optical systems, environmental monitoring and in the biomedical area including the development and application of microneedles. Furthermore, he is working in the area of flow control in microfluidic devices and the study of complex microflow phenomena.