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Device Fabrication using Inkjet Micropatterning

Abstract

Compared to other patterning techniques, inkjet printing provides a very versatile and low cost microfabrication capability that can be used to implement organic electronic devices including printable sensors, transistors, LEDs, and photovoltaics. Inkjet technology can be used to pattern a variety of liquids including polymers, proteins, and various solvents. Inkjet patterns can be made on a variety of substrates and in 3D.

Project Description

Compared to other patterning techniques, inkjet printing provides a very versatile and low cost microfabrication capability that has attracted significant research and industrial interest. Inkjet technology can be used to pattern a variety of liquids including polymers, proteins, and various solvents. This technique is used for non-contact patterning onto rigid, flexible, rough, smooth, and 3-D substrates. This process is accurate, high resolution, high speed, and consumes very little material as compared to a lithographic process. As a result, inkjet fabrication can be used for rapid prototyping and is capable of producing large batches of device variants that can later be grouped and evaluated based on various performance characteristics. The inks can be infused with nanostructures such as NWs and NTs and Quantum Dots (QDs) to modify material properties targeting new applications.

Dr. K. Walus is investigating inkjet fabrication of polymer composite based chemical sensors including quantum-dot fluorescence, chemicapacitive, chemiresistive, and surface acoustic wave devices. Applications of these sensors include in-situ monitoring of inorganic gases and volatile organic compounds for air pollution control, toxic site monitoring, chemical spill detection, as well as biomolecular sensors such as DNA and protein sensors. Our other research interest is in the application of inkjet micopatterning in applications of tissue engineering. As part of this research, we have been successful in printing living cells for future artificial tissues.

Faculty Supervisor(s)

    Konrad.Walus   

Researchers(s)

    gabrielman